Planned Parenthood in the States
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There has been much activity, and much confusion, about the status of abortion during the coronavirus situation. At the national level, instructions went out saying that all elective surgeries should be postponed. Since abortion is a “choice,” it clearly is an elective surgery.

The governors of the individual states issued their own rules for their states and in those rules some of them addressed elective surgeries and many tried to halt all “non-essential” procedures. Some declared abortion as “essential” and permitted it to continue unabated. A few state governors included abortions in the list of non-essential surgeries and ordered them to stop.

Some states (e.g., Maryland) said that abortions were non-essential elective surgeries. The abortionists simply ignored the directive and, as far as we can tell, there was no effort made by the state to enforce its directive.

Similarly, in Pennsylvania, the governor issued a directive to close all businesses “that are not life sustaining” with guidance from the state government forbidding elective procedures. Planned Parenthood Keystone said it would continue operations “for abortion services only” but suspended all other in-person services. 

Other states declared that abortions should be halted during the coronavirus crisis and sought to enforce that order. The actual situation is fluid in many of these states, but here is the situation as of April 7.

Alabama—ordered all abortions to cease. Planned Parenthood filed a lawsuit. On March 30, a federal judge issued a temporary restraining order blocking the state from halting abortions. 

Iowa—ordered all abortions to cease. Planned Parenthood filed a lawsuit. As a result of “discussions,” the state agreed to let abortion providers decide on a “case-by-case basis” if that particular abortion was “essential.” Planned Parenthood dropped its lawsuit.

Mississippi—has tried to halt abortions in the state. Planned Parenthood has only one facility in the state and it does not commit surgical or medical abortions. 

Ohio—ordered all abortions to cease. Planned Parenthood filed a lawsuit. A federal judge issued a temporary restraining order blocking the state from halting abortions. Three judges from the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals issued an order April 6 that allows the federal judge’s temporary restraining order to stand. Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost will be on a call this Friday, April 10 at 10:00 AM (Eastern), to address Ohio’s  “Cease and Desist” Order for Elective Surgical Procedures and its Implications for Planned Parenthood. If any of our readers want to participate, you can...

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Oklahoma—ordered all abortions to cease. Planned Parenthood filed a lawsuit. On April 6, a federal district judge granted a temporary restraining order that allows abortionists to continue “essential and time-sensitive abortions.” 

Texas—ordered all abortions to cease. Planned Parenthood filed a lawsuit. A federal judge issued a temporary restraining order on March 30 allowing abortion to continue. On March 31, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals reversed the decision. As we write this, abortions are not permitted in Texas during the coronavirus situation. Planned Parenthood has eight surgical abortion facilities and two more that just do medical abortions. None of them can commit abortions at this time.

As you can see, Planned Parenthood is fighting very hard to be able to keep killing God’s children, even as the country is suffering from over 10, 000 COVID-19 deaths.

Please save this short article. If anyone ever tells you that abortion is just a small part of Planned Parenthood’s business, show this to them and document how much money Planned Parenthood spent just trying to be able to kill more babies.